Springer’s copyright agreement is, according to Springer, compatible with posting your article on the arXiv under the CC-BY license

It is far from clear to me that Springer’s copyright agreement (quoted below) is compatible with posting your paper on the arXiv under the CC-BY license. Happily, a Springer representative has just confirmed for me that this is allowed:

Let me first say that the cc-by-0 license is no problem at all as it allows for other publications without restrictions. Second, our copyright statement of course only talks about the version published in one of our journals, with our copyright line (or the copyright line of a partner society if applicable, or the author’s copyright if Open Access is chosen) on it.

At least if you are publishing in a Springer journal, and more generally, I would strongly encourage you to post your papers to the arXiv under the more permissive CC-BY-0 license, rather than the minimal license the arXiv requires.

As a question to any legally-minded readers: does copyright law genuinely distinguish between “the version published in one of our journals, with our copyright line”, and the “author-formatted post-peer-review” version which is substantially identical, barring the journals formatting and copyright line?

 

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7 thoughts on “Springer’s copyright agreement is, according to Springer, compatible with posting your article on the arXiv under the CC-BY license

  1. The current Springer license agreement (I include it here as it’s hard to find online except when you’re about to sign it) reads:

    The copyright to this article, including any graphic elements therein (e.g. illustrations, charts, moving images), is hereby assigned for good and valuable consideration to Springer International Publishing effective if and when the article is accepted for publication and to the extent assignable if assignability is restricted for by applicable law or regulations (e.g. for U.S. government or crown employees). Author warrants (i) that he/she is the sole owner or has been authorized by any additional copyright owner to assign the right, (ii) that the article does not infringe any third party rights and no license from or payments to a third party is required to publish the article, (iii) that the article has not been previously published or licensed and (iv) that in case the article contains excerpts from other copyrighted works (e.g. illustrations, tables, text quotations) Author obtained written permissions to the extent necessary from the copyright holder thereof and cited the sources of the excerpts correctly.

    The copyright assignment includes without limitation the exclusive, assignable and sublicensable right, unlimited in time and territory, to reproduce, publish, distribute, transmit, make available and store the article, including abstracts thereof, in all forms and media of expression now known or developed in the future, including pre- and reprints, translations, photographic reproductions and microform. Springer may use the article in whole or in part in electronic form, such as use in databases or data networks (e.g. the Internet) for display, print or download to stationary or portable devices. This includes interactive and multimedia use as well as posting the article in full or in part or its abstract on social media accounts closely related to the Journal, and the right to alter the article to the extent necessary for such use.

    Authors may self-archive the Author’s accepted manuscript of their articles on their own websites. Authors may also deposit this version of the article in any repository, provided it is only made publicly available 12 months after official publication or later. He/she may not use the publisher’s version (the final article), which is posted on SpringerLink and other Springer websites, for the purpose of self-archiving or deposit. Furthermore, the Author may only post his/her version provided acknowledgement is given to the original source of publication and a link is inserted to the published article on Springer’s website. The link must be provided by inserting the DOI number of the article in the following sentence: “The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/%5Binsert DOI]”.

    Prior versions of the article published on non-commercial pre-print servers like arXiv.org can remain on these servers and/or can be updated with Author’s accepted version. The final published version (in pdf or html/xml format) cannot be used for this purpose. Acknowledgement needs to be given to the final publication and a link must be inserted to the published article on Springer’s website, by inserting the DOI number of the article in the following sentence: “The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/%5Binsert DOI]”. Author retains the right to use his/her article for his/her further scientific career by including the final published journal article in other publications such as dissertations and postdoctoral qualifications provided acknowledgement is given to the original source of publication.

    Articles disseminated via link.springer.com are indexed, abstracted and referenced by many abstracting and information services, bibliographic networks, subscription agencies, library networks, and consortia.

    After submission of the agreement signed by the corresponding author, changes of authorship or in the order of the authors listed will not be accepted by Springer.

  2. It’s worth pointing out that the above discussion applies to journals, only. Springer also publishes several book series, including the “Lecture Notes” and “Proceedings in Math & Statistics” series; and the standard copyright agreement for those is much more restrictive and is incompatible with posting on the Arxiv or any other open-access repository. Springer appear not to be attempting to enforce this at present.

  3. I don’t see why it matters whether copyright law distinguishes between these two versions, the Springer agreement itself clearly does.
    The agreement says “Prior versions of the article published on non-commercial pre-print servers like arXiv.org can remain on these servers and/or can be updated with Author’s accepted version.” There is no restriction on the arXiv posting’s license terms. That would lead me to think that CC-BY is acceptable, provided that the article is already posted on arXiv as CC-BY before signing the agreement.

  4. Certainly things like their format, for instance the choice of typeface and layout, as well as trademarks such as their logo etc is covered by copyright law. These are part of the _expression_ of the facts therein. Since they presumably (and do!) introduce changes in the typesetting process, the final copy and the final author copy are not precisely the same document. In the future, when we aren’t all using pdf but some more semantic format (like a good, XML/MathML derived e-book format) then it becomes trickier, and more about the actual words, since then one can put any format one likes via an applied style. Ideally by that point we are using CC licenses or their ilk more widely anyway….

  5. Actually, in contrast to my previous reply, I read something recently that said publisher copyright claims even stretched back to preprint versions of the same article, and so it was necessary for publishers to explicitly give authors permission to post these on the arXiv/personal websites/etc. I guess it’s been a good thing that the default arXiv license is irrevocable, unlike for instance the preprint server SSRN (recent purchased by Elsevier) where people can remove articles once they are published in a journal, or even on a whim.

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